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Noelle Neff’s Beginner Photography Tips and Guidelines

Noelle Neff’s Beginner Photography Tips and Guidelines

Embracing photography comes with a lot of thrill and zeal to explore, but few are made to understand how to pursue the specialty to become professional photographers. Many aspiring photographers quite because they lack the good organization that is needed to offer them an ample opportunity to make their dream a reality. If you are among those starting out on photography, you need to first understand the basics of the industry before you can delve into professional photography. Here are guidelines to assist you pursue the process seamlessly to become a professional photographer.

Don’t get stressed to acquire the most expensive equipment
It is the dream of every photographer to have all the equipment needed to make their photography a success, but this is not necessarily the only path you should rely on to nurture your career. You don’t need to stress over buying the most expensive equipment as you can start with DIY photography options that will complement your needs while pursuing photography. Surfing through the internet for explanatory videos will be a good way to start your career by first acquiring vital information about the basics of photography that you must embrace to succeed.

Have your camera all the time
One way to ensure you practice filming different scenes is carrying your camera with you most of the times. In different cases, amazing events happen unexpectedly and when you have a camera at such times it becomes a pleasurable moment to experiment with your skills to know how good you are at doing random pictures. Good opportunities come when you least expect, so have your tools around to ensure when such moments show up you swiftly swing to action to enjoy your skills in photography. The more you do it the highly likely you will be perfecting your skills.

Embrace free learning resources
Like Noelle Neff suggests, learning might be expensive for a beginner who is not funded well, so if you lack the funds to enroll for a course, it is advisable to take advantage of the many free resources available online. Some of the platforms that offer you good resources for learning include GIMP and Flickr, which have been free all along. Take several minutes every day to read the information provide on these platforms, and if possible get your camera and try some of the shots explained to see if you can replicate what the experts suggest.

Do photos regularly
Definitely, the only way to gain experience is by taking photos regularly and ensuring that you hone your skills at photography. The more you are able to do it you will sharpen your skills and end up as an expert in photography. Take the time to practice regularly because sitting without doing it might be trigger you to forget all what you have learned already. One of the best ways to do it is by following the weekly DPS forum assignments and comparing with what others on the platform have achieved. You can easily gauge your success with this simple process.

Also be willing to experiment with new ideas as this will help you to discover things you have never tried before. You might also end up producing something you love and admire, so to become a perfect photographer you need to constantly maintain the habit of practicing and looking for new tricks to apply.

Matthew David Parker: Finding a Talented Photographer

Matthew David Parker: Finding a Talented Photographer

I have teamed up with Matthew David Parker again to talk about ways to find a talented photographer. It’s not easy, but here are 4 tips to get you started.

Finding a talented photographer can sometimes be enough to drive a person a little insane. So many factors go into a great photographer. There’s no denying that there are many photographers working in the field. There’s also no arguing that it can sometimes be a little difficult to immediately figure out who lives up to the hype. If you’re looking for a photographer who can give you the A+ work you expect, these useful search tips can help you significantly.

1. Request photographer recommendations.

Photographer recommendations can do you a lot of good. It can be daunting to hire a professional photographer without a recommendation from someone else. It can sometimes set you up for a lot of disappointment, too. If you want to feel confident about your photographer selection, you should go with someone who gets the stamp of approval from an individual you know and trust. If you’re friends with a local real estate agent who worked with a professional photographer for her official website, she may be able to offer you an amazing suggestion. If she has a great image on her website, then you know you’re golden. Recommendations from trustworthy individuals can be terrific for your peace of mind.

2. Assess experience levels and backgrounds.

If you want to work with a photographer who has skill on his side, it can help to go with someone who has ample experience. Don’t hire a photographer who just started working in the field a couple of months ago. Go with someone who has been following the photography dream for a while now. Matthew David Parker is an acclaimed photographer who has had a lifelong zeal for all things that involve photography. His passion is clear in his amazing work, too. It’s not only critical to look for a photographer who has a lot of experience, either. It can also be a great idea to look for one who has extensive training. You should look for photographers who are part of prestigious photographic associations as well.

3. Schedule face-to-face meetings with photographers.

If you want to find the perfect photographer for your specific needs, you should think about scheduling face-to-face meetings with any potential candidates. It can be tough to get a feel for a photographer without meeting him or her in person. Email, text message and phone communication can often be somewhat confusing. If you meet a photographer and get the opportunity to look him in the eyes, it can tell you so much. It can reveal how enthusiastic a photographer may be about giving you his time. It’s also vital to assess how comfortable and at ease you feel around a photographer. If you don’t feel 100 percent comfortable in the company of a certain photographer, you should look elsewhere. Lack of comfort will never give you the results you deserve. A photographer needs to have a strong rapport with his subject.

4. Consider your budget.

Costs to hire professional photographers can vary dramatically. There are some photographers who have rather steep rates. There are other photographers who are comparatively budget-friendly. If you want to select the ideal photographer for your individual needs, you have to consider your budget. Don’t select a photographer who costs too much. That can complicate things and give you additional pressure you don’t need. There are many photographers who are terrific value for your money. If you make a point to find a photographer who fits into your available budget, you should be on a good track.

Don’t rush your photographer search. A fantastic photograph can benefit you in so many ways. A bad one, on the other hand, won’t do much for you at all.

You can hire Matthew at Matthew David Parker Photography.

Roundup: What type of camera do you use?

Roundup: What type of camera do you use?

I asked 17 bloggers what camera they use to photograph their subjects. You’ll be surprised what the most common answer was, an iPhone! Take a look at the specific answers below. I guess what we have most available is what we most often use!

I use my iPhone. I always have it with me and the pictures are good enough for what I need to do. Arturo Alvarez Demalde, @arturoalvarezd

I use my iPhone 7 camera. Technology has advanced over time and I feel that these days many smartphone cameras are just as good as a regular camera, but they take up less space. With the right iPhone accessories I believe it is possible to take photos that are just as good as using an expensive camera. I do have a regular camera as well, but I haven’t pulled it out in ages. Victoria Heckstall, @wahmjourney91

Don’t laught, but all I use is the camera in my iPhone 6! Why? Because I always have it with me and it is easy to use. I was a film camera person up until 2011 when my house burned down with my camera in it. I’ve never owned or used a digital camera. I get many, many compliments on my photographs. I excel at nature shots especially, and also architectural and travel pictures. With some judicious filters/editing I am very happy with my pictures! Leslie Sholly, @LeslieSholly

Cannon SX160IS I use this camera because it takes amazing action shots, and is so user friendlly Christy Williams, @crw4bama

While I’d love to have an expensive SLR, I choose to use a bridge camera. The camera I use is the Nikon COOLPIX L820 16 MP Digital Camera with 30x Zoom. It is very affordable and it works great for travel when trying to save space. I can photograph the mountains, the kids, food, etc. It offers many built-in options for indoor/outdoor photography, zooming as well as auto options for those who just want to snap a quick photo. It has a built in microphone that does pretty well when videoing for vlogs. This camera is lightweight and fits inside my “go-bag” so I can always carry it with me. Crystal Martin, @CinnamonHollow

I have a Nokia Lumia 1020 with an amazing 38 MP camera, auto/manual focus, and Xenon flash. It’s what I use for all of my photography, because it’s right on my smartphone so I always have it with me. Besides, you really can’t beat the photo quality! Jamie Knupp, @cluelessmomma

I use a Nikon D5200 but I’m upgrading to a Canon. I really love my Nikon but I’m switching over to the Canon because of the ease of use. It’s a bit more user friendly for the non-photography person such as myself. I want to dig deeper into my food and family photography and feel the Canon will work better for me Debbie Tom, @HBSoulStains

“Well, interestingly enough this one question I get asked rather often – which type of camera do I use? And even though this topic has been touched on so many times, I still get asked this one question a lot.To me it’s just a matter of what works best for someone who just wants a tool to take better pictures of their children and friends without ever having to think about the settings and features. And I’ll admit for someone who loves photography, it is a very good question. Although It’s almost impossible to answer without additional context as it has a number of follow up questions – why do you use the camera? And those are really great questions to ask.

And also questions – what are you planning to photograph? Are you going to invest more into the system? What lenses would you like to own? Are you planning to take up photography professionally? And for a beginner to be able to answer all these questions in return requires a certain amount of research. But the cameras that I use to take pictures with are the DSLR cameras.The reason that I use the DSLR cameras is because they are great cameras to use to take pictures with. And that’s why I will probably continue to use these great cameras for taking pictures.” tracy collins, @tlkool3

Canon EOS Rebel T5 MICHELLE FIGUEROA, @michellemamade4

I shoot with a Nikon D7000 for digital and a Minolta for film. I am a professional photographer that doesn’t spend a fortune on equipment and these cameras suit my needs. Brandy, @stitchblade@gmail

My iPhone 6 Plus or my Samsung Galaxy S6. Why? I’m too broke paying for my cellular plan to save for a real camera. Tina Bassett, @LIChevyMetsGrrl

Samsung NX3300 its lightweight, easy to use, has interchangeable lenses if needed and has wifi capability JoAnna, @_joanna_e

Cannon Rebel T5 Jamela Porter, @reviewsbypink

I use the ipad mostly to save time Cassandra McCann, @star95011

iPhone 6s Melanie Kampman, @giveawaybandit

Nikon d300s though I’d love to upgrade to a d800! Jess Holmes, @WildishJess

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 Digital Camera Kimberly Wright, @KeystrokesByKim

Photography Roundup: Lighting, Lighting, Lighting!

Photography Roundup: Lighting, Lighting, Lighting!

I recently asked about 50 bloggers to give me an opinion on the following question:

Which part of photography was the most difficult for you to learn or master?

Honestly I didn’t expect the answers that I received! 24 people met the deadline and here are their answers. Sign up here to be part of the next roundup!

Learning to shoot in low light conditions has always been difficult to me. Increasing the ISO feels like cheating, but 1600-3200 is often the only way I can get great pictures! Ian Leaf, @IanLeaf

lighting. Liz Cleland, @westnewyorker

Setting up food/products in a well lit area of my home while making it look natural and not staged. Linda Kinsman, @ismilefirst

Lighting!! Kristi Gilbert, @therobotmommy

lighting, I am still learning. Miranda, @myrabev

I photograph food and I also photograph my son and my husband. But I find photographing food harder and the most difficult part about it for me is the styling. I’ve been trying my best to master it though. Erlinda Reese, @Lynndeeee

Aperture was the hardest for me to wrap my head around. I actually still struggle with it! I find myself going back to automatic sometimes. Jen Rattie, @craftymomof3

The lighting. Not having glares etc. Lisa C. aka Lisa-Queen of Random, @Lisa2900

Lighting. My house has such poor lighting. Tina, @LIChevyMetsGrrl

Lighting! My kitchen makes for a poor photography studio because all of my photos have a yellow tone. Not good for a food blogger! It took lots of practice to learn how to shoot and edit photos to look the way I wanted them to. Ashley Hill, @thehillhangout

Glare and I sometimes still have trouble. Cassandra McCann , @star95011

Trying to get the lighting right Jamie Knupp, @Cluelessmomma

food Tara Pittman, @momknowsbest15

getting enough light in a dark place w/o flash Judy Antell, @wheelsandeats

Getting the right lighting is crucial, and I would recommend natural light if at all possible. Also experiment with different angles, and take tons of photos. Then on the computer, narrow down the best ones. Teresa Britton, @MomsWhoSave

Definitely lighting! I am still learning! Kim Delatorre, @shopwithmemama

It’s hard to choose just one thing, because great photography depends on mastering and balancing a whole symphony of details. Beyond the basic challenge of learning how my camera really worked, I’d say composition was my biggest personal challenge – and the area in which I’m most proud of my growth over the years. It took me a long time to learn that less can be more and that contrasting colors can breath life into otherwise dull photographs. Mary Helen Leonard, @Marymakesgood

Getting the best angle to photograph. Patty, @pizzalogger

I struggled most with learning to shoot manually on my camera. Rose Atwater, @rosebakes

Outside or surrounding props around the food or plate. Deborah Dennert, @debbzs

understanding how to balance exposure, ISO, WB, etc. all together Jess Holmes, @WildishJess

Editing photos is my weakness. I have Photoshop and a premium version of PicMonkey, yet during the editing stage my photos still don’t turn out as good as I would like. Victoria, @wahmjourney91

I would have to say that food photography was the most difficult for me. I share food pictures all of the time, across both business and personal social networks. I didn’t realize that taking a picture from above, of the same paper plates we eat off of wouldn’t cut it. So, I started buying mismatched plates, bowls, platters, and China sets with missing pieces so I could make my pictures pop just a little. I also learned that taking a picture from the side or level with the plate would really capture the natural beauty of the food. It’s ok if a cherry tomato rolled away or a drop of gravy is running down the plate or the fork knocked the rice off of the perfect mound. It’s more natural this way and not staged. Brandy Oliver, @busymommylist

Learning nw equipment is always toughest for me. It takes practice and repetition. Mike Munter, @mike_munter

Thank you to all of the participants. To be part of the next roundup, subscribe here!

ACM Group Addresses Universal Importance of the Closer’s Role

ACM Group Addresses Universal Importance of the Closer’s Role

Chad Winters has always been interested in learning more about the principles and philosophies responsible for the continued success of any organization, even when that organization seems to have very little in common with his own organization, ACM Group. The founder of a remarkably successful sustainability and brand-building firm, Mr. Winters has been a close observer of the San Francisco Giants for the past few years, particularly due to the organization’s consistent ability to outperform expectations while winning title after title.

 

According to Mr. Winters, organizational balance and continuity are critical components that support the efforts of any well-run organization. Mr. Winters has deeply valued balance and continuity over the years since he first founded ACM Group, and he immediately recognized the role these qualities have played in helping the Giants win three World Series titles since 2010. With an exceptional core group of players in place — along with a rare level of continuity among the team’s executive personnel and coaching staff — the Giants have created a culture in which the whole is always greater than the sum of its parts.

 

As a keen observer of the club, Mr. Winters saw how a sudden lack of balance affected the entire organization during a 2016 season that began with such promise. The instability of the bullpen led manager Bruce Bochy — one of the most respected leaders in the game — to make the kind of questionable decisions Giants fans had only seen from opposing dugouts and not from their own.

 

As Mr. Winters points out, Bochy did not suddenly become a poor in-game tactician; the instability of the bullpen and especially the lack of a reliable and lights-out closer made it nearly impossible to confidently develop and implement an effective strategy for winning close games. Despite the fact that 2017 is an odd year, Mr. Winters is staunch in his belief that the Giants will contend for the World Series after an offseason in which they will surely secure the bullpen help they lacked during the 2016 campaign.